English version

irrigate in Agriculture topic

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishirrigateir‧ri‧gate /ˈɪrɪɡeɪt/ verb [transitive]  1 TAto supply land or crops with water The water in Lake Powell is used to irrigate the area.irrigated land/farms/crops2 technicalMH to wash a wound with a flow of liquidirrigation /ˌɪrəˈɡeɪʃən/ noun [uncountable] major irrigation projects→ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
irrigateIn order to overcome the problem of an inadequate water supply, many parts of the arid and semi-arid regions have been irrigated.A cut begins to irrigate above the champion's eye.The stored water could then be used to irrigate adjacent agricultural land, and hydropower revenues would cover the inevitable losses.In the West, a 160-acre irrigated farm was too large, while a 160-acre unirrigated farm was too small.Had those surpluses been directed elsewhere in the valley, they could have created a great many small irrigated farms.Large amounts of cotton are also grown in irrigated fields surrounding the town.Right now, the value of the water on the ranch for irrigating livestock feed is about $ 160 an acre-foot.The stored water is then used to irrigate nearby agricultural land.A system of channels carries water down from the mountains to irrigate the soil.One-third of the water irrigates thirsty crops of low value - alfalfa, cotton, rice - and pasture.irrigated land/farms/cropsHad those surpluses been directed elsewhere in the valley, they could have created a great many small irrigated farms.All of the newly irrigated land has been allocated to Sri Lankan farmers and their families in plots of one hectare.That, in fact, was about all the irrigated land one family could be expected to work.But they were not willing to see one acre of irrigated land succumb to the forces of nature, regardless of cost.