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Topic: ARTS


capture

1 verb
     
cap‧ture1 W3 [transitive]
1

person

to catch a person and keep them as a prisoner:
Government troops have succeeded in capturing the rebel leader.
40 captured French soldiers
2PMA

place/thing

to get control of a place or object that previously belonged to an enemy, during a war:
The town was captured after a siege lasting ten days.
The Dutch fleet captured two English ships.
3

animal

to catch an animal after chasing or following it:
The tiger was finally captured two miles outside the village.
4

film/record/art

A to succeed in recording, showing, or describing a situation or feeling, using words or pictures:
These photographs capture the essence of working-class life at the turn of the century.
The robbery was captured on police video cameras.
5

capture somebody's imagination/attention etc

to make someone feel very interested in something:
His stories of foreign adventure captured my imagination.
6

capture somebody's heart

to make someone love you
7

business/politics

B to get something that previously belonged to one of your competitors:
We aim to capture eight percent of the UK wine market.
Republicans captured three Senate seats from the Democrats.
8

capture the headlines

to be talked or written about a lot in the newspapers or on television:
Irvine Welsh first captured the headlines with his novel 'Trainspotting'.
9TDTD

computer

technical to put something in a form that a computer can use:
The data is captured by an optical scanner.
10

chess

DGB to remove one of your opponent's pieces from the board in chess
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