Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Topic: ASTRONOMY

Date: 1300-1400
Language: Old North French
Origin: lancher, from Late Latin lanceare 'to throw a lance', from Latin lancea; LANCE1

launch

1 verb
     
launch1 W2 [transitive]
1

start something

to start something, usually something big or important:
The organization has launched a campaign to raise $150,000.
The Canadian police plan to launch an investigation into the deal.
launch an attack/assault/offensive
The press launched a vicious attack on the President.
The book launched his career as a novelist.
2

product

to make a new product, book etc available for sale for the first time:
The company hopes to launch the new drug by next October.
3

boat

TTW to put a boat or ship into the water
4

sky/space

to send a weapon or spacecraft into the sky or into space:
A test satellite was launched from Cape Canaveral.
5TD

computer

to make a computer program start [= open]:
Double-click on an icon to launch an application.
6

launch yourself forwards/up/from etc

to jump up and forwards into the air with a lot of energy

launch into something

phrasal verb
1 to suddenly start a description or story, or suddenly start criticizing something:
Nelson launched into a blistering criticism of greedy lawyers.
2 to suddenly start doing something:
Don't just launch into exercise without warming up first.

launch out

phrasal verb
to start something new, especially something that involves risk
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