Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Topic: BIOLOGY

Date: 1200-1300
Language: Old Norse
Origin: leggr

leg

1 noun
     
leg1 S1 W1
1

body part

[countable]HB one of the long parts of your body that your feet are joined to, or a similar part on an animal or insect:
a young boy with skinny legs
She fell and broke her leg.
four-legged/long-legged etc
four-legged animals
2

meat

[uncountable and countable]DF the leg of an animal when it is cooked and eaten as food:
roast leg of lamb
leg
3

furniture

[countable]DHF one of the upright parts that support a piece of furniture:
One of the legs on the table was a bit wobbly.
a chair leg
a three-legged stool
4

clothing

[countable]DCC the part of your trousers that covers your leg:
The legs of my jeans were covered in mud.
He rolled up his trouser legs and waded out into the stream.
5

journey/race

[countable] one part of a long journey or race
leg of
the final leg of the Tour de France
6

sport

[countable] British EnglishDSF one of the series of games in a football competition played between two teams:
Leeds will have to win the second leg if they are to go forward to the finals.
7

not have a leg to stand on

informal to be in a situation where you cannot prove or legally support what you say:
If you didn't sign a contract, you won't have a leg to stand on.
8

get your leg over

British English informal not polite to have sex with someone
9

have legs

American English informal if a piece of news has legs, people continue to be interested in it and talk about it

➔ on its last legs

at last1 (9)

; ➔ on your last legs

at last1 (8)

; ➔ pull somebody's leg

at pull1 (11), leg-pull, leg-up, peg leg, sea legs

➔ shake a leg

at shake1 (9)

➔ show a leg

at show1 (23)

➔ stretch your legs

at stretch1 (7)
Word of the Day
The BIOLOGY
Word of the Day is:

Other related topics