Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Topic: BIOLOGY

Date: 1300-1400
Origin: SWEAT1

sweat

2 noun
     
sweat2
1

liquid on skin

[uncountable] drops of salty liquid that come out through your skin when you are hot, frightened, ill, or doing exercise [= perspiration]:
Ian came off the squash court dripping with sweat.
Beads of sweat appeared on his forehead.
Sweat poured down his face.
work up a sweat (=do physical exercise or hard work that makes you sweat)
Karen was on the exercise bikes, just beginning to break a sweat (=start sweating).
2

get into a sweat about something

informal to become nervous or frightened about something:
Don't get into such a sweat about it! It's only a test.
3

break (out) into a sweat

to become very nervous or frightened:
Drops in stock market prices have investors breaking out into a sweat.
4

a cold sweat

a state of nervousness or fear, in which you start to sweat, even though you are not hot
in/into a cold sweat
I woke up from the nightmare in a cold sweat.
5

no sweat

spoken used to say that you can do something easily:
'Are you sure you can do it on time?' 'Yeah, no sweat!'
6

sweats

[plural] American English informal
a) DCCDS clothes made of thick, soft cotton, worn especially for sport [= sweatsuit]
b) DCCDS trousers of this type [= sweat pants]
7

work

[singular] old-fashioned hard work, especially when it is boring or unpleasant
8

the sweat of somebody's brow

literary the hard effort that someone has made in their work
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