Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Topic: CLEANING

Date: 1200-1300
Language: Old French
Origin: rincer, perhaps from Vulgar Latin recentiare, from Latin recens; RECENT

rinse

1 verb
     
rinse1 [transitive]
1DHC to wash clothes, dishes, vegetables etc quickly with water, especially running water, and without soap:
Let me just rinse my hands.
Rinse the vegetables under a cold tap.
rinse something out
Don't forget to rinse out your swimsuit.
2 to remove soap, dirt etc from something by washing it quickly with water
rinse something off/out/away etc
Leave the shampoo for two minutes, then rinse it off with warm water.
I rinsed the mud out under the tap.
The cream rinses off easily.
3DC to put colour into your hair [= dye]
4 if you rinse your mouth, or rinse your mouth out, you wash it by filling it with water and then spitting the water out [↪ gargle]
WORD FOCUS: clean WORD FOCUS: clean
wash with soap and water
wipe
with a damp cloth
brush
with a brush to remove the dirt
polish
by rubbing with a cloth
scrub
by rubbing hard
sweep
with a broom
mop
with water and a mop (a tool with a long handle)
vacuum
also hoover British English with a machine that sucks up dust
disinfect
using chemicals to kill germs
cleanse
to clean your skin using a special cream
rinse
to put water on to remove dirt or soap
dust
to remove dust, for example with a cloth


See also
clean
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