Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Topic: CLEANING

Language: Old English
Origin: spinnan

spin

1 verb
     
spin1 S3 past tense and past participle spun present participle spinning
1

turn around

[intransitive and transitive] to turn around and around very quickly, or to make something do this:
The plane's propellers were spinning.
spin (something/somebody) around
She grabbed Norm's arm and spun him around to face her.
2

somebody's head is spinning

also the room is spinning if your head or the room is spinning, you feel as if you might faint (=become unconscious) because you are shocked, excited, or drunk:
I was pouring with sweat, and my head was spinning.
The room started to spin.
3

situation/information

[transitive] to describe a situation or information in a way that is intended to influence the way people think about it - used especially about what politicians or business people do:
Supporters attempted to spin the bill's defeat to their advantage.
4

spin a tale/story/yarn

to tell a story, especially using a lot of imagination:
She spun a story about a trip to Athens to meet one of the authors.
5

wool/cotton

[intransitive and transitive]TIM to make cotton, wool etc into thread by twisting it
6

drive

[intransitive always + adverb/preposition] written to drive or travel quickly [= speed]
spin past/along etc
Barbara spun past in her new sportscar.
7

spin your wheels

American English to continue trying to do something without having any success:
I felt like I was just spinning my wheels trying to make him understand.
8

wet clothes

[transitive] British EnglishDHC to get water out of clothes using a machine after you have washed them
9

insect

[transitive]HBI if a spider or insect spins a web or cocoon, it produces thread to make it

spin off

phrasal verb
BBC to make part of a company into a separate and partly independent company, or to become a separate company
spin something ↔ off
At the time of the merger, Loral spun off its space divisions into a separate firm.
spin off from
Lucent spun off from AT&T in 1995.

spin out

phrasal verb
1

spin something ↔ out

British English to make something continue for longer than is necessary [= drag out]:
I'm paid by the hour, so I spin the work out as long as I can.
2

spin something ↔ out

British English to use money, food etc as carefully and slowly as possible, because you do not have very much of it
spin something ↔ out over
I've only got £10 left, so we'll have to spin it out over the whole week.
3 American English if a car spins out, the driver loses control of it and the car spins around
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