Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Topic: CLOTHES

Sense: 1-3, 5-7
Date: 1300-1400
Language: Old French
Origin: bote
Sense: 4
Date: 1300-1400
Language: Old English
Origin: bot 'advantage, profit, use'

boot

1 noun
     
boot
boot1 S2 W3 [countable]
1DCC a type of shoe that covers your whole foot and the lower part of your leg [↪ Wellington]:
hiking boots
a pair of boots
2TTC British English an enclosed space at the back of a car, used for carrying bags etc [= trunk American English]
The new model has a bigger boot.
3

the boot

informal when someone is forced to leave their job [= the sack; ↪ dismiss]:
The chairman denied that he had been given the boot.
He should have got the boot years ago.
4

to boot

in addition to everything else you have mentioned:
She was a great sportswoman, and beautiful to boot.
5

put the boot in

British English informal
a) to criticize or be cruel to someone who is already in a bad situation
b) to attack someone by kicking them repeatedly, especially when they are on the ground
6

the boot is on the other foot

British English used to say someone who has caused problems for other people in the past is now in a situation in which people are causing problems for them
7 American English a metal object that the police attach to one of the wheels of an illegally parked car so that it cannot be moved [= wheel clamp British English]

➔ be/get too big for your boots

at big1 (14)

; ➔ lick somebody's boots

at lick1 (7)

; ➔ tough as old boots

at tough1 (2)
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