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Topic: COLOURS AND SOUNDS


whack

2 noun
     
whack2 [countable] especially spoken
1C the act of hitting something hard, or the noise this makes:
She gave the ball a whack.
Singleton took a whack at (=tried to hit) Miller's head.
2 British English an amount of something
(the) full whack
If you're unemployed, you don't have to pay the full whack (=the full amount).
There's still a fair whack (=quite a large amount) of work to be done.
These agencies charge top whack for tickets.
3

do your whack (of something)

British English to do a fair or equal share of a job or activity:
I've done my whack of the driving - it's your turn.
4

have a whack at something

British English take a whack at something American English to try to do something:
'Are you any good at doing maths?' 'I'll have a whack at it.'
5

in one whack

American English all on one occasion:
Steve lost $500 in one whack.
6

out of whack

American English if a system, machine etc is out of whack, the parts are not working together correctly:
The printer's out of whack again.
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