Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Topic: COMPUTERS


down

1 adverb, preposition, adjective
     
down1 S1 W1
1

to a lower position

to or towards a lower place or position [≠ up]:
David bent down to tie his shoelace.
Get down off the table.
Tears were streaming down my face.
The sun was going down and it would soon be dark.
They came running down the stairs.
She stood on a balcony looking down into the courtyard.
Glancing down the list of runners, I noticed a familiar name.
Her hair came down to her waist.
Ken fell asleep face down (=with his face towards the ground) on the couch.
2

in a lower place

in a lower place or position [≠ up]:
We heard the sound of laughter down below.
The bathroom is down those stairs.
Halfway down the page, there was the item I was looking for.
3

to lie/sit

into a sitting or lying position:
Please sit down.
I think I'll go and lie down for a while.
4

along

at or to a place that is further along something such as a road or path:
A young man came hurrying down the street.
She looked down the road to see if anyone was coming.
There is a pleasant little cafe bar a hundred yards down the road.
The bus stop is a bit further down on the left-hand side.
5SG

south

in or towards the south [≠ up]:
They drove all the way down from Boston to Miami.
They sailed down the east coast of Africa.
Now he's bought a villa down south.
a trip down Mexico way
6

somewhere local

at or to a place that is not far away:
She's just gone down to the shops.
I saw her down at the station this morning.
7

river

away from the place where a river starts [≠ up]:
Chunks of ice came floating down the river.
8

fastened to a surface

used with verbs that mean 'fasten' to show that something is fastened firmly to the surface or object below it:
The coffin lid had been nailed down.
9

less

at or towards a level or amount that is less [≠ up]:
Keep your speed down.
House prices have come down in recent months.
Turn the radio down.
down to
Sharif cut his report down to only three pages.
10DS

losing

losing to an opponent by a certain number of points
two goals down/three points down etc
Swindon were six points down at one stage.
11TC

written

used with verbs that mean 'write' to show that you write something on paper or in a book:
I'll write down the address for you.
Start by jotting down a few ideas.
Let's put you down as self-employed.
12

on a list

if you are down for something, your name is on a list of people who want to do something or are intended to do something
down for
Purvis is down for the 200 metre freestyle event.
We've already put his name down for nursery school.
down to do something
I've got you down to do the table decorations.
13

to later times

from an earlier time in history to a later time or to people who are born in later times:
a person whose words and actions have inspired millions of people down the centuries
This knowledge was handed down in the family from father to son.
The story has been passed down the generations for a thousand years.
down to
traditions that have come down to us from medieval times
14BB

paid immediately

paid to someone immediately:
A top quality freezer for only £20 down and £5 a week for a year.
15

every part

from top to bottom:
I want you to wash my car down.
16MI

swallowed

in or into your stomach as a result of swallowing:
Meg's been very ill and can't keep her food down.
He gulped down the coffee.
17

sad

unhappy or sad:
Tim's been feeling down.
18TDTD

computer

if a computer is down, it is not working [≠ up]
19

be down to somebody

if an action or decision is down to you, it is your responsibility:
It's down to me to make sure that everyone is happy.

➔ be up to somebody

at up1 (19b)
20

be down to somebody/something

to be the result of one person's actions or one particular thing:
Chris's success is all down to him.
21

be down to your last pound/dollar/litre etc

to be left with only a small amount of something:
We're down to our last five dollars.
22

down to something/somebody

including everything or everyone, even the smallest thing or the least important person:
Everyone uses the cafeteria, from the managing director down to the office boy.
The plans were all complete down to the last detail.
23

be/go down with something

MI to have a particular illness:
Jane's gone down with flu.
24

Down with somebody/something

spokenPPP used to say that you strongly oppose a government, leader etc and want them to lose their power:
Down with the government!
25

be down on somebody/something

informal to have a severe attitude towards someone or something, especially when this is unfair:
Why is Mark so down on her at the moment?
26SEC

leaving university

British English used to say that someone leaves or has left a university at the end of a period of study
down from
Sarah came down from Oxford in 1966.
27

completed

already done or completed:
Well, you've passed your second test, so it's two down and four more to go.
28

down under

informalSANSG in or to Australia or New Zealand
29

Down!

spoken used to tell a jumping dog to get down
30

be down with somebody

spoken informal to be friends with someone

➔ be down on your luck

at luck1 (17)
WORD FOCUS: sad WORD FOCUS: sad
unhappy sad because of the situation you are in
miserable
very sad
depressed
sad for a long time, and feeling that your life will never get better
gloomy
/glum looking sad
down
/down in the dumps sad and without much interest in life - usually not in a serious or permanent way
broken-hearted
very sad because someone has ended a romantic relationship with you
homesick
sad because you are a long way from your home and your friends


See also
sad
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