Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Topic: COOKING

Sense: 1
Date: 1400-1500
Language: Old French
Origin: pochier, from poche 'bag, pocket'
Sense: 2-5
Date: 1600-1700
Language: Old French
Origin: pocher

poach

verb
     
poach
1

cook

[transitive]
a) DFC to cook an egg in or over gently boiling water, without its shell:
poached eggs on toast
b) DFC to gently cook food, especially fish, in a small amount of boiling water, milk etc:
Poach the salmon in white wine and water.
2

animals

[intransitive and transitive]SCC to illegally catch or shoot animals, birds, or fish, especially on private land without permission:
Deer have been poached here for years.
3

people

[transitive] to persuade someone who belongs to another organization, team etc to leave it and join yours, especially in a secret or dishonest way:
That company's always poaching our staff.
poach from
Several of their reporters were poached from other papers.
4

steal ideas

[transitive] to take and use someone else's ideas unfairly or illegally
poach from
characters poached from Shakespeare
5

poach on somebody's territory/preserve

British English to do something that is someone else's responsibility, especially when they do not want you to do it
poaching noun [uncountable]
the poaching of elephants for their ivory tusks
WORD FOCUS: cook WORD FOCUS: cook
fry (in oil)
boil
(in hot water)
bake
(bread and cakes in an oven)
roast
(meat or vegetables in an oven)
microwave
(using a microwave oven)
grill
/broil American English (using a grill)
steam
, toast, simmer, poach, barbecue, stir-fry, saute, chargrill

raw (not cooked)
rare
(used about meat that has been cooked for a short time)
well-done
(used about meat that has been cooked for a long time)
cook

See also
cook
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