Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Topic: COOKING

Date: 1600-1700
Origin: simper 'to simmer' (15-19 centuries), perhaps from the sound

simmer

1 verb
     
sim‧mer1
1 [intransitive and transitive]DFC to boil gently, or to cook something slowly by boiling it gently:
Bring the soup to the boil and allow it to simmer gently for about half an hour.
2 [intransitive] if you are simmering with anger, or if anger is simmering in you, you feel very angry but do not show your feelings
simmer with
He was left simmering with rage.
3 [intransitive] if an argument is simmering, people feel angry with each other but only show it slightly:
The row has been simmering for some time.
Violent revolt was simmering in the country.

simmer down

phrasal verb
to become calm again after you have been very angry:
We decided she needed some time to simmer down.
WORD FOCUS: cook WORD FOCUS: cook
fry (in oil)
boil
(in hot water)
bake
(bread and cakes in an oven)
roast
(meat or vegetables in an oven)
microwave
(using a microwave oven)
grill
/broil American English (using a grill)
steam
, toast, simmer, poach, barbecue, stir-fry, saute, chargrill

raw (not cooked)
rare
(used about meat that has been cooked for a short time)
well-done
(used about meat that has been cooked for a long time)
cook

See also
cook
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