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Topic: CRIME


fiddle

2 verb
     
fiddle2
1 [intransitive] to keep moving and touching something, especially because you are bored or nervous:
Stop fiddling, will you!
I sat and fiddled at the computer for a while.
fiddle with
She was at her desk in the living room, fiddling with a deck of cards.
2 [transitive] British English informalSCC to give false information about something, in order to avoid paying money or to get extra money:
Bert had been fiddling his income tax for years.
fiddle the books (=give false figures in a company's financial records)
3 [intransitive] to play a violin

fiddle around

phrasal verb
to waste time doing unimportant things

fiddle around with something

phrasal verb
1 to move the parts of a machine in order to try to make it work or repair it:
I've been fiddling around with this old car for months but I still can't get it to work.
2 to make small unnecessary changes to something - used to show disapproval [= mess around with]:
Why did you let her fiddle about with the remote control?
The bus company is always fiddling around with the schedules.

fiddle with something

phrasal verb
1 to move part of a machine in order to make it work, without knowing exactly what you should do:
After fiddling with the tuning I finally got JFM.
2 to move or touch something that does not belong to you, in an annoying way:
Don't let him fiddle with my bag.
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