Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Topic: DAILY LIFE

Sense: 1-5, 7
Date: 1300-1400
Origin: PACK2
Sense: 6
Date: 1500-1600
Origin: pack 'to make a secret agreement' (16-17 centuries), perhaps from pact

pack

1 verb
     
pack1 S2 W3
1

clothes

[intransitive and transitive] also pack upD to put things into cases, bags etc ready for a trip somewhere:
I forgot to pack my razor.
Have you finished packing yet?
pack your things/belongings
Kelly packed her things before breakfast.
pack a bag/case
You'd better pack your bags. We're leaving in an hour.
pack somebody something
Shall I pack us a picnic?
2

goods

[transitive] also pack up to put something into a box or other container, so that it can be moved, sold, or stored
pack something in/into something
Now wild mushrooms are available all year, packed in handy 25g boxes.
3

crowd

[intransitive always + adverb/preposition, transitive] to go in large numbers into a space, or to make people or animals do this, until the space is too full
pack into/in/onto
50,000 fans packed into the stadium.
The sheep had been packed into a truck and transported without food or water.
4

protect something

[transitive] to cover or fill an object with soft material so that it does not get damaged
pack in/with
Glass must be packed in several layers of paper.
5

snow/soil etc

DLG to press snow, soil, sand etc down so that it becomes hard and firm
pack something down
Pack the soil down firmly.
6

pack your bags

informal to leave a place and not return, especially because of a disagreement
7

pack a gun

American English informalPMW to carry a gun
8

pack a (hard/hefty/strong etc) punch

also pack a wallop informal to have a very strong or impressive effect:
The Spanish wine, with the flavour of honey, packed quite a punch.

➔ send somebody packing

at send (11)

pack something ↔ away

phrasal verb
to put something back in a box, case etc where it is usually kept:
Christmas was over and the decorations packed away.

pack in

phrasal verb
1

pack something ↔ in

also pack something into something to do a lot in a limited period of time, or fit a lot of information, ideas etc into a limited space:
We packed a lot of sightseeing into two weeks.
In an essay of 2000 words, you can pack a lot in.
2

pack somebody ↔ in

informal if a film, play etc packs people in, it attracts large numbers to come and see it:
Any film starring Tom Cruise always packs them in.
3

pack something ↔ in

British English informal to stop doing a job or activity that you are not enjoying:
After one year, I packed in university.
Sometimes I feel like packing it all in and going off travelling.
4

pack it in

British English spoken used to tell someone to stop doing something that is annoying you
5 British English informal if a machine packs in, it stops working because there is something wrong with it [= pack up]:
Halfway to the airport, the engine packed in.

pack somebody/something off

phrasal verb
to send someone to stay somewhere for a period of time
pack somebody/something off to
My parents used to pack us off to camp every summer.

pack up

phrasal verb
1 to put things into cases, bags etc ready for a trip somewhere:
Most of the holidaymakers had packed up and gone.
pack something ↔ up
I gave her a hand packing up her clothes and stuff.
2

pack something ↔ up

to put something into a box or other container, so that it can be moved, sold, or stored:
Don't worry. The removal men will pack everything up.
3 informalB to finish work at the end of the day:
'What time do you pack up?' 'Oh, about six.'
4 British English informalT if a machine packs up, it stops working because there is something wrong with it [= pack in]:
The photocopier's packed up again.
5BE

pack something ↔ up

British English informal to stop doing something, especially a job:
He packed up his teaching job after only three months.
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