Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Topic: DAILY LIFE

Language: Old English
Origin: sacc, from Latin saccus, from Greek sakkos 'bag, sackcloth'

sack

1 noun
     
sack1 [countable]
1
a) TAD a large bag made of strong rough cloth or strong paper, used for storing or carrying flour, coal, vegetables etc
sack of
a sack of potatoes
b) also sackfulTM the amount that a sack can contain
sack of
We need about a sack of rice.
2

the sack

British English informalBEC when someone is dismissed from their job:
They've never actually given anyone the sack.
He got the sack for stealing.
She claimed she'd been threatened with the sack.
3

hit the sack

old-fashioned informal to go to bed:
It's one o'clock - time to hit the sack.
4

in the sack

informal in bed - used to talk about sexual activity:
I bet she's great in the sack.
5

the sack of something

formal a situation in which an army goes through a place, destroying or stealing things and attacking people:
the sack of Rome in 1527
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