Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Topic: DEATH

Language: Old English
Origin: ende

end

1 noun
     
end1 S1 W1
1

last part

[singular] the last part of a period of time, event, activity, or story [≠ beginning, start]
end of
Costs are expected to double by the end of 2005.
at the end
What would she find at the end of her journey?
Hooker's death marked the end of an era.
I played the tape from beginning to end.
2

finished

[singular] a situation in which something is finished or no longer exists
put/bring an end to something
It's hoped the talks may bring an end to the violence.
call for/demand an end to something
The EU is demanding an end to the ivory trade.
At last it seemed the war might be coming to an end.
The spacecraft is nearing the end of its useful life.
be at an end
He rose to indicate that the conversation was at an end.
Well, I hope that's the end of the matter.
Another year has passed, with no end in sight to the suffering.
3

long object

[countable] the part of a place or long object that is furthest from its beginning or centre
end of
Jo joined the end of the line.
We sat at opposite ends of the table.
the far end (=furthest from you) of the room
The channel measures 20 feet from end to end.
stand/place something on end (=in an upright position)
He stood the box on end to open it.
lay/place something end to end (=in a line, with the ends touching)
bricks laid end to end
4

tip/point

[countable] the thin part of something long or narrow, that is furthest from you [= tip]
end of
The end of the pencil snapped.
He lost the end of his finger.
He wore spectacles perched on the very end of his nose.
5

scale

[countable usually singular] one of the two points that begin or end a scale
lower/cheaper etc end
the cheaper end of the price range
At the opposite end of the political spectrum are the Marxist theories.
Some teenagers are just a nuisance, but at the other end of the scale there are kids who pose a real threat.
6

connection

[countable usually singular] one of two places that are connected by a telephone call, journey etc
the end of the phone/line
Sometimes, all you need is a calm voice on the end of the phone.
We'll get a bus connection at the other end.
Any problems at your end (=where you are)?
7

remaining piece

[countable] especially British English a small piece of something that is left after you have finished with it:
cigarette ends
8

aim

[usually plural] an aim or purpose, or the result you hope to achieve
political/military etc ends
40% of all research is undertaken for military ends.
She'll do anything to achieve her own ends.
Every task has a clear end in view.
to that end formal:
He wants to cut costs, and to that end is looking at ways of cutting the company's operations.
an end in itself (=something you do because you want to, not in order to get other advantages)
IT is a tool for learning, not merely an end in itself.
the end justifies the means (=used to say that doing bad things is acceptable if they achieve an important result)
9

part of an activity

[singular] informal part of a job, activity, or situation that involves or affects one person or group of people:
She works in the sales end of things.
10

sport

[countable]DS one of the two halves of a sports field
11

death

[countable usually singular]MX a word meaning death - used to avoid saying this directly:
He met his end (=died) in a car accident.
12

at the end of the day

spoken used to give your final opinion after considering all the possibilities:
At the end of the day, it's his decision.
13

for days/weeks etc on end

for many days, weeks etc without stopping:
He was tortured for days on end.
14

in the end

after a period of time, or after everything has been done:
What did you decide in the end?
see usage note lastly
15

end of story

spoken informal used to avoid saying any more about a subject that is embarrassing or secret:
I tripped and hurt my arm. That's it - end of story.
16

the end of your tether/rope

the point at which you are so angry and tired of a situation that you can no longer deal with it:
Frustrated and bitter, Hogan had reached the end of his tether with politics.
17

the end of the road/line

the end of a process, activity, or state:
18

make ends meet

to have only just enough money to buy the things you need:
When Mike lost his job, we could barely make ends meet.
19

it's not the end of the world

spoken used to tell someone that a problem is not as bad as they think
20

hold/keep your end up

British English informal to stay brave and hopeful in a difficult situation
21

no end

spoken informal very much:
Your letter cheered me up no end.
22

no end of trouble/problems etc

spoken informal a lot of trouble etc:
This will cause no end of trouble.
23

the living end

American English spoken used as an expression of slight disapproval - often used humorously:
What will she do next? She's the living end!
24

go to the ends of the earth

literary to do everything possible to achieve something:
I'd go to the ends of the earth to be with him.
25

to the end of time

literary forever
dead end odds and ends

➔ be-all and end all

at be2 (15)

➔ to the bitter end

at bitter1 (6)

➔ burn the candle at both ends

at burn1 (19)

➔ jump/be thrown in at the deep end

at deep1 (17)

➔ go off at the deep end

at deep1 (18)

➔ be at a loose end

at loose1 (14)

➔ make somebody's hair stand on end

at hair (8)

➔ be on/at the receiving end (of something)

at receive (5)

➔ be on the sharp end of

at sharp1 (19)

➔ come to a sticky end

at sticky (6)

➔ the tail end of something

at tail1 (6)

➔ at your wits' end

at wit (7)

➔ get the wrong end of the stick

at wrong1 (15)
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