Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Topic: ECONOMICS

Sense: 1-3
Date: 1400-1500
Origin: BOOM2
Sense: 4-6
Date: 1500-1600
Language: Dutch
Origin: 'tree, long piece of wood'

boom

1 noun
     
boom1 S3
1

increase in business

[singular]BPE a quick increase of business activity [≠ slump]:
The boom has created job opportunities.
boom in
a sudden boom in the housing market
consumer/investment/property etc boom
the post-war property boom
boom years/times
In boom times, airlines do well.
the economic boom of the 1950s
The economy went from boom to bust (=from increasing to decreasing) very quickly.
boom town
2

when something is popular

[singular] an increase in how popular or successful something is, or in how often it happens:
the disco boom of the 1970s
boom in
the boom in youth soccer in the U.S.
baby boom
3

sound

[countable]CPMW a deep loud sound that you can hear for several seconds after it begins, especially the sound of an explosion or a large gun sonic boom
4

boat

[countable]TTW a long pole on a boat that is attached to the bottom of a sail, and that you move to change the position of the sail
5

long pole

[countable]
a) TBTI a long pole used as part of a piece of equipment that loads and unloads things
b) TCPTCB a long pole that has a camera or microphone on the end
6

on a river/harbour

[countable]TTWTBC something that is stretched across a river or a bay to prevent things floating down or across it
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