Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Topic: ECONOMICS

Date: 1500-1600
Origin: quease 'to press, squeeze' (15-17 centuries), from Old English cwysan

squeeze

1 verb
     
squeeze1
1

press

[transitive] to press something firmly together with your fingers or hand:
She smiled as he squeezed her hand.
He squeezed the trigger, but nothing happened.
2

press out liquid

[transitive] to get liquid from something by pressing it:
Squeeze the oranges.
squeeze something out
Try to squeeze a bit more out.
squeeze something on/onto something
Squeeze a bit of lemon juice onto the fish.
3

small space

[intransitive,transitive always + adverb/preposition] to try to make something fit into a space that is too small, or to try to get into such a space [= squash]
squeeze into
Five of us squeezed into the back seat.
squeeze through/past
He had squeezed through a gap in the fence.
squeeze somebody/something in
We could probably squeeze in a few more people.
4

squeeze your eyes shut

to close your eyes very tightly
5

just succeed

[intransitive always + adverb/preposition] to succeed, win, or pass a test by a very small amount so that you only just avoid failure:
Greece just squeezed through into the next round.
6

limit money

[transitive]PEBF to strictly limit the amount of money that is available to a company or organization:
The government is squeezing the railways' investment budget.

squeeze somebody/something ↔ in

phrasal verb
to manage to do something although you are very busy:
How do you manage to squeeze so much into one day?
I can squeeze you in at four o'clock.

squeeze something ↔ out

phrasal verb
1 to do something so that someone or something is no longer included or able to continue:
If budgets are cut, vital research may be squeezed out.
2 to squeeze something wet in order to remove the liquid from it:
Squeeze the cloth out first.
3

squeeze something out of somebody

to force someone to tell you something:
See if you can squeeze more information out of them.

squeeze up

phrasal verb
to move close to the person next to you to make space for someone else
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