English version

rote in Education topic

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishroterote /rΙ™ΚŠt $ roʊt/ noun [uncountable] πŸ”Š πŸ”Š formalSELEARN when you learn something by repeating it many times, without thinking about it carefully or without understanding it πŸ”Š In old-fashioned schools, much learning was by rote. πŸ”Š the rote learning of facts
Examples from the Corpus
roteβ€’ rote memorizationβ€’ There is too little food or warmth; learning is by rote, and students make their own clothes.β€’ If you have a good memory, you can learn by rote.β€’ I know that many teachers of the present day think that learning by rote is archaic.β€’ The litany of inequities is so familiar to her now that she recites by rote.β€’ Others recite complex speeches by rote that sound all too familiar, and collapse at the slightest interruption.β€’ Margaret used to be a great one for rote learning.β€’ And is rote learning necessarily in opposition to discovery learning?β€’ Science courses usually have fewer experiments and more rote learning.β€’ Simon's concert was rote and uninspired.rote learningβ€’ Students are not seen as individuals but as statistics on a conveyor belt of examinations and rote learning.β€’ Margaret used to be a great one for rote learning.β€’ And is rote learning necessarily in opposition to discovery learning?β€’ Science courses usually have fewer experiments and more rote learning.β€’ Teaching standards are very poor - lots of rote learning and copying notes from the blackboard.β€’ The result is that many have to rely heavily on rote learning and memory, with limited understanding.β€’ Readers who rely heavily on conventional visual rote learning may adjust more slowly.