Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Topic: ELECTRICAL

Date: 1100-1200
Language: Old French
Origin: chargier, from Late Latin carricare, from Latin carrus; CAR

charge

2 verb
     
charge2 S1 W2
1

money

a) [intransitive and transitive] to ask someone for a particular amount of money for something you are selling:
The hotel charges $125 a night.
charge somebody £10/$50 etc (for something)
The restaurant charged us £40 for the wine.
charge something at something
Calls will be charged at 44p per minute.
charge for
We won't charge for delivery if you pay now.
charge rent/a fee/interest etc
The gallery charges an entrance fee.
b)

charge something to somebody's account/room etc

BFB to record the cost of something on someone's account, so that they can pay for it later:
Wilson charged the drinks to his room.
Use a courier and charge it to the department.
c) [transitive] American English to pay for something with a credit card
charge something on something
I charged the shoes on Visa.
'How would you like to pay?' 'I'll charge it.'
2

crime

[transitive]SCL to state officially that someone may be guilty of a crime
charge somebody with something
Gibbons has been charged with murder.
3

blame somebody

[transitive] formal to say publicly that you think someone has done something wrong
charge that
Demonstrators have charged that the police used excessive force against them.
4

run

[intransitive always + adverb/preposition] to deliberately run or walk somewhere quickly
charge around/through/out etc
The boys charged noisily into the water.
5

attack

[intransitive and transitive] to deliberately rush quickly towards someone or something in order to attack them:
Then, with a final effort, our men charged the enemy for the last time.
charge at/towards/into
The bear charged towards her at full speed.
6

electricity

[intransitive and transitive] also charge upTEE if a battery charges, or if you charge it, it takes in and stores electricity:
The shaver can be charged up.
7

order somebody

[transitive] formal to order someone to do something or make them responsible for it
charge somebody with doing something
The commission is charged with investigating war crimes.
8

gun

[transitive]PMW old use to load a gun
9

glass

[transitive] British English formal to fill a glass charged
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