Topic: ELECTRICITY

Language: Old English
Origin: lad 'support, carrying'

load

1 noun
     
load1 S2 W3 [countable]
1

amount of something

a large quantity of something that is carried by a vehicle, person etc
load of
a load of wood
The lorry had shed its load (=the load had fallen off).
The plane was carrying a full load of fuel.
2

a load (of something)

loads (of something) British English informal a lot of something:
We got a load of complaints about the loud music.
Don't worry, there's loads of time
loads to do/see/eat etc
There's loads to see in Paris.
3

a bus load/car load/truck load etc

the largest amount of something that a vehicle can carry:
a bus load of tourists
4

a load of crap/bull etc

a load of rubbish British English spoken not polite used to say that something is bad, untrue, or stupid:
I thought the game was a load of crap.
5

work

the amount of work that a person or machine has to do:
The computer couldn't handle the load and crashed.
a light/heavy load (=not much or a lot of work)
Hans has a heavy teaching load this semester.
My work load has doubled since Henry left.
They hired more staff in order to spread the load.
6

worry

a problem or worry that is difficult to deal with:
When someone is depressed, the extra load of having financial problems can make the situation worse.
Knowing he was safe was a load off my mind (=I felt less worried).
Coping with ill health was a heavy load to bear.
7

washing

DHC a quantity of clothes that are washed together in a washing machine:
I've already done three loads of laundry this morning.
8

get a load of somebody/something

spoken used to tell someone to look at or listen to something that is surprising or funny:
Get a load of this! Your stars say you are going to meet someone who's rich.
9

weight

TBC the amount of weight that something is supporting:
a load-bearing wall
It increased the load on the wheels.
10

electricity

technicalTPE an amount of electrical power that is being produced

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