Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Topic: ELEMENTS

Date: 1300-1400
Language: Old French
Origin: Latin elementum

element

noun
     
el‧e‧ment S2 W1 [countable]
1

part

one part or feature of a whole system, plan, piece of work etc, especially one that is basic or important
element of
Honesty is a vital element of her success.
element in
the primary element in the country's economy
important/key/essential/vital etc element
Besides ability, the other essential element in political success is luck.
Business and management elements are built into the course.
2

element of surprise/truth/risk/doubt etc

an amount, usually small, of a quality or feeling:
There is an element of truth in your argument.
3

chemistry

a simple chemical substance such as carbon or oxygen that consists of atoms of only one kind compound1 (1)
4

people

a group of people who form part of a larger group, especially when the rest of the group does not approve of them [↪ faction]:
the hard-line communist elements in the party
5

the elements

[plural]DN the weather, especially bad weather:
sailors battling against the elements
6

heating

the part of a piece of electrical equipment that produces heat
7

the elements of something

the most simple things that you have to learn first about a subject:
She doesn't even know the basic elements of politeness.
8

earth/air/fire/water

HE one of the four substances (earth, air, fire, and water) from which people used to believe that everything was made
9

be in your element

to be in a situation that you enjoy, because you are good at it:
Graham was in his element, building a fire and cooking the steaks.
10

be out of your element

to be in a situation that makes you uncomfortable or unhappy:
She was out of her element in this dull little town.
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