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Topic: FOOD


fork

2 verb
     
fork2
1 also fork off [intransitive]TT if a road, river etc forks, it divides into two parts [↪ divide, split]:
The path forked off in two directions.
2

fork (off) left/right

TT to go left or right when a road divides into two parts [= turn]:
Fork left at the bottom of the hill.
3 [transitive always + adverb/preposition]DFDLG to put food into your mouth or onto a plate using a fork
fork something into/onto etc something
He forked some bacon into his mouth.
4 [transitive always + adverb/preposition]DFDLG to put manure into soil or to move soil around using a large garden fork
fork something in/over etc
In November, the soil should be forked over.

fork out (something)

phrasal verb
to spend a lot of money on something, not because you want to but because you have to
fork out (something) for/on
I had to fork out £600 on my car when I had it serviced.
We don't want to have to fork out for an expensive meal.

fork something ↔ over

phrasal verb
to give money to someone or something, or spend money on something:
The arena won't be finished until private donors fork over more money.
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