Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Topic: FOOD

Date: 1200-1300
Language: Latin
Origin: pilare 'to remove the hair from', from pilus 'hair'

peel

1 verb
     
peel
peel1
1 [transitive]DF to remove the skin from fruit or vegetables:
Peel and dice the potatoes.
2 [intransitive] if skin, paper, or paint peels, it comes off, usually in small pieces
peel from/off
The paper was peeling from the wall.
New skin grows, and the damaged skin peels off.
3 [intransitive] to lose an outer layer or surface:
The walls were peeling from the damp.
4 [transitive always + adverb/preposition] to remove the outer layer from something
peel something away/off/back
Peel away the waxed paper from the bottom of the cake.

➔ keep your eyes peeled

at eye1 (18)

peel off

phrasal verb
1

peel something ↔ off

DC to take your clothes off:
Tom peeled off his wet t-shirt and shorts.
2

peel off $20/fifty pounds etc

informal to take a piece of paper money from the top of a pile of paper money:
Manville peeled off a twenty, and pressed it into the man's hand.
3TT to leave a moving group of vehicles, aircraft etc and go in a different direction:
Two motorcycles peeled off from the line.
WORD FOCUS: cut WORD FOCUS: cut
chop to cut vegetables, meat, or wood into pieces
slice
to cut bread, vegetables, or meat into thin pieces
dice
to cut vegetables into small pieces
peel
to cut the outside part off an onion, apple etc
grate
to cut cheese or vegetables into small pieces by rubbing them against a special tool
carve
to cut pieces from a large piece of meat
saw
to cut wood using a special tool called a saw
chop down
to cut down a tree, using an axe
snip
to cut something quickly using scissors
shave
to remove hair from your face or body
trim
to remove small parts of something to make it look neat
mow
to cut grass
prune
to cut off the top part of plants, in order to make them grow better
cut

See also
cut
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