Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Topic: FOOD

Language: Old English
Origin: sticca

stick

2 noun
     
stick2 [countable]
1

part of tree

D a long thin piece of wood from a tree, which is no longer attached to the tree [↪ branch, twig]:
They collected sticks to start the fire.
2DS

tool

a long thin piece of wood, plastic etc that you use for a particular purpose:
a pair of drum sticks
a measuring stick
Aunt Lou walks with a stick (=uses a stick to help her walk).
3DF

piece

a long thin or round piece of something:
carrot sticks with dip
a glue stick
stick of
a stick of chewing gum
4

sports

a long specially shaped piece of wood, plastic etc that you use in some sports to hit a ball:
a hockey stick
5

(out) in the sticks

a long way from a town or city:
They live out in the sticks.
6

get (hold of) the wrong end of the stick

British English informal to understand a situation in completely the wrong way:
People who think the song is about drugs have got the wrong end of the stick.
7

plane

the handle you use to control a plane joystick
8

car

American English informalTTC a stick shift
9

get on the stick

American English spoken to start doing something you should be doing:
You'd better get your sales team on the stick.
10

give somebody/get (some) stick

British English spoken if you give someone stick, you criticize them for something they have done:
He's going to get some stick for this!
11

up sticks

British English informal if you up sticks, you move to a different area

➔ carrot and stick

at carrot (3)
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