English version

conglomerate in Geology topic

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishconglomeratecon‧glom‧e‧rate /kənˈɡlɒmərət $ -ˈɡlɑː-/ noun  1 [countable]BBC a large business organization consisting of several different companies that have joined together an international conglomerateindustrial/financial/media etc conglomeratesee thesaurus at company2 [countable, uncountable]HEG technical a rock consisting of different sizes of stones held together by clay3 [countable]GROUP OF THINGS formal a group of things gathered together
Examples from the Corpus
conglomerateA vast American conglomerate has announced plans to buy the site at a cost of well over a billion dollars.a media and entertainment conglomerateIn the mid-1980s the big financial conglomerates muscled into the market.In Britain the merging together of the banking and securities business in the guise of financial conglomerates has rekindled this debate.A broker buy recommendation helped conglomerate Williams Holdings inch ahead a penny to 326p.But not much demand can be expected from the large conglomerates.The German media conglomerate Kronstadt AG reported record earnings last year.This is the rough distinction between non-media conglomerates with a media side-interest and, in contrast, media conglomerates that diversified outwards.The buzz at Geneva last week was about smaller cars, wholesale commitment to environmental protection and rationalised, merged conglomerates.Conflict: there is ample opportunity for this information to be acquired and used by other divisions within the conglomerate.industrial/financial/media etc conglomerateTime Warner is the biggest media conglomerate, with the broadest reach and opportunity for synergies across different media.Does the future lie with diversified financial conglomerates or with highly specialized financial institutions?This is the rough distinction between non-media conglomerates with a media side-interest and, in contrast, media conglomerates that diversified outwards.Secondly, in so far as we are concerned with insider dealing, the practice is analysed within the context of financial conglomerates.These events paved the way for the formation of financial conglomerates and made inevitable concern over the increased potential for conflict abuse.In Britain the merging together of the banking and securities business in the guise of financial conglomerates has rekindled this debate.Vertical integration of media conglomerates adds pressure to the marketplace and the creative process.Particular emphasis placed on the problems of regulating and supervising financial conglomerates within the existing national regulatory framework.