Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Topic: GOLF

Language: Old English
Origin: hol

hole

1 noun
     
hole1 S1 W2 [countable]
1

space in something solid

an empty space in something solid
hole in
There was a huge hole in the road.
I began digging a hole for the plant.
! Do not say there is a hole on something. Say there is a hole in something.
2

space something can go through

a space in something solid that allows light or things to pass through
hole in
They climbed through a hole in the fence.
These socks are full of holes.
bullet holes (=made by bullets)
3

empty place

a place where someone or something should be, but is missing
hole in
Their departure will leave a gaping hole in Grand Prix racing.
4

weak part

a weak part or fault in something such as an idea or plan:
The theory is full of holes.
hole in
If you have holes in your game, work on them.
5

animal's home

the home of a small animal:
a rabbit hole
6

unpleasant place

informal an unpleasant place:
I've got to get out of this hole.
7

golf

a) DSG a hole in the ground that you try to get the ball into in the game of golf
b) DSG one part of a golf course with this kind of hole at one end
8

hole in one

DSG when someone hits the ball in golf from the starting place into the hole with only one hit
9

make a hole in something

informal to use a large part of an amount of money, food etc:
Holidays can make a big hole in your savings.
10

be in a hole

informal to be in a difficult situation
11

be in the hole

American English spoken to owe money:
I was something like $16,000 in the hole already.
12

need/want something like a hole in the head

spoken used to say that you definitely do not need or want something:
I need this conversation like a hole in the head.

➔ ace in the hole

at ace1 (7), black hole

; ➔ square peg in a round hole

at square1 (12), watering hole
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