Date: 1100-1200
Language: Old Norse
Origin: sæti


1 noun
seat1 S2 W1

place to sit

[countable]D a place where you can sit, especially one in a vehicle or one from which you watch a performance, sports event etcCOLLOCATIONS COLLOCATIONS
back/rear/front seat (=the back or front seat in a car) driver's seat passenger seat (=the seat next to the driver's seat in a car) window/aisle seat (=a seat next to the window or aisle, for example on a plane) empty/vacant seat front-row seat (=in a theatre, sports ground etc) good seat (=one from which you can see well) ringside seat (=a seat in the front row for a sports event, especially a boxing match) have/take a seat show somebody to their seat book/reserve a seat bums on seats British English informal (=used for talking about the number of people who go to an event, especially if this is a lot of people)
I was in the back seat and Jo was driving.
People were shifting in their seats, looking uncomfortable.
He requested a window seat for the flight.
There were no empty seats.
It was a great concert, and I had a front-row seat.
We're a long way from the stage, but they were the best seats I could get.
You can book seats online.
He is an actor who will put bums on seats.
a 10,000-seat stadium

official position

[countable]PG a position as an elected member of a government, or as a member of a group that makes official decisions
seat in/on
a seat in the National Assembly
Promotion would mean a seat on the board of directors.
Parliamentary/Senate etc seat
the Senate seat for Colorado
win/lose etc a seat (=in an election)
He predicts that his party will gain at least 12 seats.
Mr Adams is expected to keep his seat.
Labour held the seat with a 7% majority.
safe seat British English (=one that a party will not lose)
marginal seat British English (=one that another party might easily win)

part of a chair

[countable usually singular]DHF the flat part of a chair etc that you sit on:
Don't put your feet on the seat!
a wooden toilet seat
a broken bicycle seat

baby/child/car seat

a special seat that you put in a car for a baby or small child

seat of government/power

formal a city where a country's government is based

seat of learning

formal a university, college etc


[singular] the part of your trousers that you sit on
seat of
a rip in the seat of his jeans

take a back seat (to somebody/something)

to have less influence or importance:
Foreign policy will take a back seat to domestic problems for a while.

on the edge of your seat

waiting excitedly to see what happens next
a gripping movie that will keep you on the edge of your seat

do something by the seat of your pants

to do something by using only your own skill and experience, without any help from anyone or anything else, especially when this is risky or dangerous

in the driving seat

British English in the driver's seat American English controlling what happens in a situation, organization, or relationship:
We're trying to put young people in the driving seat.

in the hot seat

also on the hot seat American English informal in a difficult position where you have to make important decisions, answer questions etc


[countable] a home of a rich important family in the countryside

➔ back-seat driver

at back seat (2), window seat

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