English version

gallop in Horses topic

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishgallopgal‧lop1 /ˈɡæləp/ ●●○ verb 🔊 🔊 1 [intransitive]DSH if a horse gallops, it moves very fast with all its feet leaving the ground togethercanter, trot 🔊 A neighbour’s horse came galloping down the road, riderless. 🔊 a galloping horsesee thesaurus at run2 [intransitive, transitive]DSH if you gallop, you ride very fast on a horse or you make it go very fastgallop along/off/towards etc 🔊 I watched as Jan galloped away.3 [intransitive always + adverb/preposition]FAST/QUICK to move very quickly syn run 🔊 Ian came galloping down the stairs.→ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
gallopA thoroughbred can gallop a mile in about 90 seconds.Isabella gallops around, winning battles, expelling Moors from strongholds, her appetites expanding by the week.Meanwhile the colt galloped back and forth behind him, and the parakeets squawked.A youngster identified with a mustang goes galloping down the street with a new vitality and personality.He jumped on bareback, stuck to her like a leech and galloped her flat out through the crowd.Ralph Lauren's Polo aftershave came galloping into the kitchen, followed shortly by a now fully clothed Lee.As she felt her way forward, suddenly a knight on horseback galloped past her.She galloped past the rabbit hutches, the ducks swaying towards the pond.Golden Larch got up and galloped to the finish line.gallop along/off/towards etcI could see the ground far below me as we galloped along.Horsemen gallop along a paved road, slowing to offer tourists a trek to the Sphinx.Second, they saw foreign stock markets galloping along, delivering returns in the high double digits.I saw three horses galloping off, dragging a fourth, which was dead.In the end, I could only escape by galloping off, leaving him in full flow, and diving into a shop.It galloped towards the boy in silence, swinging a thorn bush from its arm.Bare chested and wet trousered, the job done, they swank before their audience then gallop off to Fair Hill.And if the herd is threatened, they will gallop off together or maybe huddle together, touching each other for reassurance.