Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Topic: HOUSE

Language: Old English
Origin: flor

floor

1 noun
     
floor1 S1 W1 [countable]
1

in a building

DHH the flat surface that you stand on inside a building:
a polished wooden floor
a puddle of water on the kitchen floor
a warehouse that has 410,000 square feet of floor space
see usage note ground1
2

in a car

British EnglishTTC the part of a car that forms its inside floor [= floorboard American English]
3

level in building

TBB one of the levels in a building:
a ground floor flat
on the top/first/tenth etc floor
Our office is on the top floor.
floor of
We are located on the seventh floor of the building.
see usage note storey
4

ocean/forest/cave floor etc

the ground at the bottom of the ocean, the forest etc:
creatures that live on the ocean floor
see usage note ground1
5

for dancing

APDTBB an area in a room where people can dance:
There were two or three couples already on the dance floor.
take (to) the floor (=begin dancing)
Everyone took to the floor for the last waltz.
6

where people work

TBB a large area in a building where a lot of people do their jobs:
The stock market floor was wildly busy.
He wasn't keen on the idea of working on the shop floor (=the part of a factory where people make things using machines).
7

limit

PE an officially agreed limit below which something cannot go [↪ ceiling]:
Manufacturers have tried to put a floor under the price of their products.
8

the floor

a) the people attending a public meeting:
Are there any questions from the floor?
b) TBBPGP the part of a parliament, public meeting place etc where people sit:
The delegates crowded the floor of the House.
9

take the floor

to begin speaking at an important public meeting:
The chairman then took the floor.
10

have the floor

to be speaking or have the right to speak at an important public meeting:
He stepped aside to allow other speakers to have the floor.
11

go through the floor

BF if a price, amount etc goes through the floor, it becomes very low [≠ go through the roof]:
Share prices have gone through the floor.
US/UK DIFFERENCE US/UK DIFFERENCE

The bottom area of a building, on the same level as the land around it, is called the ground floor. In American English this can also be called the first floor. In British English the first floor is one level up from the ground. In American English this is the second floor.floor or storey/story? See note at STOREYGRAMMAR!! Say on the first/second/fifth etc floor The cafeteria is on (NOT at/in) the top floor.
WORD CHOICE: WORD CHOICE:

storey, story, floor
Storey (BrE) or story (AmE) is usually used to talk about the structure of a building a building dozens of storeys high a three-storey houseThe plural of story is stories The office block was 20 stories high.To talk about where someone or something is in a building, use floor We went up to the top floor. He works on the fifteenth floor. Is there a bathroom on this floor?See also storey
WORD CHOICE: WORD CHOICE:

ground, land, earth, soil, floor
The ground is the surface that you walk on when you are outdoors There were a few flakes of snow on the ground. an area of muddy groundland is an area of ground that is owned or controlled by someone They were on his land. land set aside for housingIt is also the part of the earth's surface that is not covered in water animals that live on landearth or soil is the soft substance that covers the ground and that plants grow in Green shoots peeped through the earth. fertile soilThe Earth or earth is also the planet that we live on.The floor is the surface that you walk on when you are indoors There's mud all over the floor!See also ground
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