English version

board in Household topic

boardboard2 ●●○ verb  1 [intransitive, transitive] formalTT to get on a bus, plane, train etc in order to travel somewhere The couple boarded the train for New York. Passengers were standing on the dock, waiting to board.RegisterIn everyday English, people usually say get on a bus, plane etc rather than board: When she heard the news, she got on the next plane for Chicago.2 be boarding3 [intransitive always + adverb/preposition]DH to stay in a room in someone’s house that you pay for Several students boarded with Mrs. Smith.4 [intransitive]SES to stay at a school at night as well as during the day Dickie was sent away to school as soon as he was old enough to board. board something ↔ out board something ↔ up→ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
boardFlight 503 for Toronto is now boarding.They boarded a flight for Israel.A week later he boarded a ship bound for New York.Phoebe boards here during the week and goes home at weekends.Police boarded the Aberdeen to Newcastle plane after the pilot radioed for help.The sooner Morgan boarded the chopper and pushed off the better.Before boarding the plane, Jenny tried once more to call home.Her parents offered no explanation when police boarded their plane at Chicago airport yesterday to arrest them for abandoning their children.My only knowledge is the pubs that still remain but are boarded up.I boarded with the Jansens until I found a place of my own.I board with the Nicholsons during the week.