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Topic: HOUSEHOLD

Language: Old English
Origin: glæs

glass

1 noun
     
glass1 S1 W1
1

transparent material

[uncountable]DHTIG a transparent solid substance used for making windows, bottles etc:
a glass bowl
a piece of broken glass
pane/sheet of glass (=a flat piece of glass with straight edges)
the cathedral's stained glass windows
glass
2

for drinking

[countable]DFD a container used for drinking made of glass [↪ cup]
Nigel raised his glass in a toast to his son.
3

amount of liquid

[countable] the amount of a drink contained in a glass
glass of
She poured a glass of wine.
glass
4

for eyes

glasses

[plural]D two pieces of specially cut glass or plastic in a frame, which you wear in order to see more clearly [= spectacles]:
He was clean-shaven and wore glasses.
I need a new pair of glasses.
! Do not say 'a glasses': She's got nice (NOT a nice) glasses. dark glasses, field glasses
5

glass objects

[uncountable]DHDF objects which are made of glass, especially ones used for drinking and eating:
a priceless collection of Venetian glass
6

people in glass houses shouldn't throw stones

used to say that you should not criticize someone for having a fault if you have the same fault yourself
7

under glass

DLGHBP plants that are grown under glass are protected from the cold by a glass cover
8

mirror

[countable] old-fashionedDCDH a mirror
9

the glass

old-fashionedTDN a barometer
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