English version

adaptation in Human topic

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishadaptationad‧ap‧ta‧tion /ˌædæpˈteɪʃən/ AWL (also adaption /əˈdæpʃən/) noun  1 [countable] a film or television programme that is based on a book or playadaptation of the BBC adaptation of the best-selling booktelevision/film/stage etc adaptation He’s working on a screen adaptation of his latest novel.2 [uncountable]CHANGE/BECOME DIFFERENT formal the process of changing something to make it suitable for a new situationadaptation to adaptation to the environment
Examples from the Corpus
adaptationIn addition, a decrease in size seems to have accompanied adaptation to an exclusively arboreal life.Its film adaptation was a big hit and won five Oscars, including best picture.The work does not involve major adaptations or renovation.This form developed bipedalism and other adaptations to the newly opening arid savannah landscape and eventually became the ancestor of man.In this way, provisional adaptations turn into routine commitments.It is simply that adaptation and ancestry can explain what adaptation alone can not.She was responsible for the adaptation of the book "The Witches of Eastwick" into a stage play.television/film/stage etc adaptationWhere a film adaptation could ventilate the humid bachelor atmosphere of Hornby's novel is in giving opportunities for women.The censors had also insisted on a cut in his stage adaptation of Anna Karenina.Its film adaptation was a big hit and won five Oscars, including best picture.Equally disappointing is the latest stage adaptation of a Roald Dahl story for children at Christmas.adaptation toOur company's adaptation to shifting consumer tastes has been a great success.