Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Topic: ILLNESS AND DISABILITY

Language: Old English
Origin: bledan, from blod; BLOOD

bleed

verb
     
bleed past tense and past participle bled
1

blood

a) [intransitive]MI to lose blood, especially because of an injury:
Your nose is bleeding.
Tragically, she bled to death.
bleed profusely/heavily (=bleed a lot)
Mrs Burke was found unconscious and bleeding profusely.
b) [transitive] to take some blood from someone's body, done in the past in order to treat a disease:
When he fell sick several days later, he had a doctor bleed him.
2

money

[transitive] to force someone to pay an unreasonable amount of money over a period of time:
His ex-wife clearly intends to bleed him for every last penny.
bleed somebody dry/white (=take all their money, possessions etc)
The ten-year war has bled the country dry.
3

air/liquid

[transitive] to remove air or liquid from a system in order to make it work properly, for example from a heating system:
We need to bleed the radiators.
4

colour

[intransitive]CC to spread from one area of cloth or paper to another [= run]:
Wash it in cold water so the colours don't bleed.
5

bleed red ink

informal if a company or business bleeds red ink, it loses a lot of money rather than making money:
Analysts predict the retailer will continue to bleed red ink, with losses topping $180 million.

➔ my heart bleeds (for somebody)

at heart (38)
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