Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Topic: ILLNESS AND DISABILITY

Date: 1300-1400
Origin: From the sound

buzz

1 verb
     
buzz1
1

make a sound

[intransitive] to make a continuous sound, like the sound of a bee:
a loud buzzing noise
2

moving around

[intransitive always + adverb/preposition]
a) to move around in the air making a continuous sound like a bee:
Bees were buzzing around the picnic tables.
b) to move quickly around a place
Pamela buzzed around checking that everything was ready.
There were all sorts of rumours buzzing through the office.
3

excitement

[intransitive] if a group of people or a place is buzzing, there is a lot of activity or excitement
4

call

[intransitive and transitive]
a) to call someone by pressing a buzzer:
Kramer buzzed at the security door, and I let him in.
buzz for
Tina buzzed for her secretary.
b) to make something happen, for example make a door or gate open or close, by pressing a buzzer
buzz somebody in/out
She buzzed them in and greeted them warmly.
buzz somebody through something
The guard buzzed me through the gate.
5

thoughts

[intransitive] if your head or mind is buzzing with thoughts, ideas etc, you cannot stop thinking about them
buzz with
My mind was buzzing with new ideas.
Questions started buzzing round in my head.
6

ears

[intransitive]MI if your ears or head are buzzing, you can hear a continuous low unpleasant sound
7

aircraft

[transitive] informalTTA to fly an aircraft low and fast over buildings, people etc:
Military jets buzzed the city.

buzz off

phrasal verb
1

buzz off!

used to tell someone in a rude way to go away
2 British English to go away:
I've finished everything, so I'll buzz off now.
Word of the Day
The ILLNESS AND DISABILITY
Word of the Day is:

Other related topics