English version

drive in Industry topic

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishdrivedrive1 /draɪv/ ●●● S1 W1 verb (past tense drove /drəʊv $ droʊv/, past participle driven /ˈdrɪvən/) 🔊 🔊 1 OPERATE A VEHICLEvehicle a) [intransitive, transitive]TTC to make a car, truck, bus etc move alongdrive to/down/off etc 🔊 I am planning to drive to Morocco next year. 🔊 the man driving the car 🔊 Can you drive? 🔊 So when did you learn to drive? 🔊 Bye! Drive carefully! 🔊 He drives 12 miles to work. 🔊 He drives (=has) a BMW estate. b) [intransitive always + adverb/preposition] if a car, truck etc drives somewhere, it moves there 🔊 After the accident, the other car just drove off. c) TRAVEL SOMEWHERE[intransitive]TTC if people drive somewhere, they travel somewhere in a car 🔊 Shall we drive or take the bus?drive to/down/off etc 🔊 They drove back to Woodside. d) TAKE somebody SOMEWHERE[transitive always + adverb/preposition]TTC to take someone somewhere in a car, truck etc 🔊 She drove Anna to London. 🔊 I’ll drive you home.drive yourself 🔊 I drove myself to hospital.2 FORCE somebody/somethingmake somebody move [transitive] to force a person or animal to go somewhere 🔊 Torrential rain drove the players off the course. 🔊 With a few loud whistles, they drove the donkeys out of the enclosure.3 FEELINGmake somebody do something [transitive] to strongly influence someone to do somethingdrive somebody to do something 🔊 The detective wondered what had driven Christine to phone her.drive somebody to/into something 🔊 The noises in my head have nearly driven me to suicide. 🔊 Phil, driven by jealousy, started spying on his wife.4 make somebody/something be in a bad state [transitive] to make someone or something get into a bad or extreme state, usually an emotional onedrive somebody crazy/nuts/mad/insane (=make someone feel very annoyed) 🔊 This cough is driving me mad!drive somebody crazy/wild (=make someone feel very sexually excited)drive somebody up the wall/out of their mind (=make someone feel very annoyed)drive somebody to distraction/desperation 🔊 The mosquitoes drive me to distraction.drive somebody/something into something 🔊 The factory had been driven into bankruptcy.5 HIThit/push something into something [transitive] to hit or push something into something elsedrive something into something 🔊 We watched Dad drive the posts into the ground. 🔊 She drove her heels into the sand.6 make somebody work [transitive] to make a person or animal work harddrive yourself 🔊 Don’t drive yourself too hard.7 sports [intransitive, transitive] a) to move a ball etc forward in a game of baseball, football, golf etc by hitting or kicking it hard and fast 🔊 He drove the ball into the corner of the net. b) to run with the ball towards the goal in sports such as basketball and American football8 PROVIDE POWERprovide power [transitive]TP to provide the power for a vehicle or machinepetrol-driven/electrically-driven/battery-driven etc 🔊 a petrol-driven lawn mower9 rain/wind etc [intransitive always + adverb/preposition] if rain, snow, wind etc drives somewhere, it moves very quickly in that direction 🔊 The rain was driving down hard.10 drive a coach and horses through something11 MAKE A HOLEmake a hole [transitive always + adverb/preposition]TI to make a large hole in something using heavy equipment or machinery 🔊 They drove a tunnel through the mountains.12 drive something home13 drive a wedge between somebody drive/strike a hard bargain at hard1(18)COLLOCATIONSMeaning 4: to make someone or something get into a bad or extreme state, usually an emotional onephrasesdrive somebody crazy/mad/insane spoken (also drive somebody nuts spoken informal) (=make someone feel very annoyed)The continuous noise was driving me crazy.drive somebody crazy/wild (=make someone feel very sexually excited)He drives women wild.drive somebody up the wall/round the bend/out of their mind spoken informal (=make someone feel very annoyed)That voice of hers drives me up the wall.drive somebody to distraction (=make someone feel very upset or annoyed)She was being driven to distraction by her husband’s bad habits.drive somebody to despair/desperation (=make someone despair)Escalating personal debts have driven many people to despair.drive somebody to drink (=make someone so annoyed or upset that they depend on alcohol)His problems had almost driven him to drink. drive at something drive somebody ↔ away drive something ↔ down drive somebody/something ↔ in drive off drive somebody/something ↔ out drive something ↔ up→ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
driveOn our trip to Florida, I drove 300 miles in one day."How are you going to get there?" "I'm driving.""How do you get to work?" "I drive.""What car do you drive?" "A Fiat Brava."Jeff drives a green Volvo.Driving a Rolls Royce into a swimming pool was one of the most dangerous stunts Crawford had to perform.Several times they started to build a city, but they were always driven away by misfortunes or bad omens.Gang activity has driven business away from downtown.Drive carefully - the roads are very icy.He drove her home, leaving her down the block but watching her to make sure she got in okay.Her mother's continual nagging drove her into running away from home.At the trial, she claimed that years of abuse from her violent husband had driven her to kill him.She didn't really want to drive herself to the doctor, so I said I'd take her.The Protestant yeomanry still rode around the countryside intent on driving home the lessons of 1798: Rebellion will be punished!I'm learning to drive. In fact, I take my test next week.He said he would drive me home.Can you drive me to the airport next Friday?My love of competition is what drives me.She drove off without saying goodbye.McGwire drove the ball into right field.Drive the nail into the wall at a downward angle.It swirled and howled, driving the sleet and snow towards him alone.Many farmers claim that they have been driven to desperation by the latest blow to the industry.They completely failed and were driven to policies of austerity before they even got started.Jenny drove to the coast for the weekend.I learned how to drive when I was fifteen.drive yourselfI'd like a trap or a gig, something light I could drive myself.The coach, on loan from Stanford, has driven herself even harder than usual.The celebration started with the Club's President, Valentine Fleming, driving himself in, after which the match commenced.But don't drive yourself into the ground.Treat others as you would yourself, but drive yourself like a stuck mule.And they can drive themselves quite crazy.The lumps are heavy but I drove myself till my arms cried out and the sweat runs down my back.drive somebody to distraction/desperationAnd just like in the Kronenbourg ad she can't stop driving men to distraction.Boredom and isolation were driving Polly to desperation.He seeks to blackmail Headstone but succeeds only in driving the man to desperation.His constant invasion of her privacy was driving her to distraction.Or will his lack of ambition drive you to distraction?They lived inside a person's body and wriggled about until their presence drove him to distraction.Zoe talks her dad into letting her have driving lessons but she and Janine drive Garry to distraction.drive yourselfI'd like a trap or a gig, something light I could drive myself.The coach, on loan from Stanford, has driven herself even harder than usual.The celebration started with the Club's President, Valentine Fleming, driving himself in, after which the match commenced.But don't drive yourself into the ground.Treat others as you would yourself, but drive yourself like a stuck mule.And they can drive themselves quite crazy.The lumps are heavy but I drove myself till my arms cried out and the sweat runs down my back.