English version

cover in Insurance topic

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishcovercov‧er1 /ˈkʌvə $ -ər/ ●●● S1 W1 verb [transitive] 🔊 🔊 1 hide/protect (also cover up)COVER to put something over or be over something in order to hide, close, or protect it 🔊 Cover the pot and bake for an hour. 🔊 She wore a low-cut dress, partly covered by a thin shawl.cover something with something 🔊 Dan covered his face with his hands.2 layer if something covers a surface, it forms a layer over it 🔊 Grey mould covered the walls. 🔊 Much of the country is covered by snow.cover something with/in something 🔊 The bulletin board was covered with messages. 🔊 The eruption of the volcano covered states as far away as Montana in a fine layer of ash.3 DEAL WITH/INCLUDEinclude to include or deal with a particular subject or group of things 🔊 a course covering business law 🔊 Are there any areas you feel are not covered adequately in the book? 🔊 ‘Exercise’ is a word which covers a vast range of activities. 🔊 We need more time to cover so much ground (=include so many things). 🔊 pollutants that are not covered by the Kyoto agreement4 distanceTRAVEL to travel a particular distance 🔊 They were hoping to cover 40 miles yesterday. 🔊 A leopard can cover a lot of ground very quickly.5 areaCOVER to spread over an area 🔊 The city covers 25 square miles.6 newsTCREPORT to report the details of an event for a newspaper or a television or radio programme 🔊 I’d just returned from covering the Cambodian war.7 moneyENOUGH if a sum of money covers the cost of something, it is enough to pay for it 🔊 The award should be enough to cover her tuition fees. 🔊 Airlines are raising fares to cover the rising costs of fuel.8 insuranceBFI if your insurance covers you or your possessions, it promises to pay you money if you have an accident, something is stolen etc 🔊 Most policies cover accidental damage to pipes. 🔊 The treatment wasn’t covered by her health care insurance.cover somebody against/for something 🔊 Are we covered for theft?cover somebody to do something 🔊 He thought he was covered to drive the vehicle.9 guns a) PROTECTSHOOTto protect someone by being ready to shoot anyone who attacks them 🔊 I’ll make for the door – cover me, will you? b) SHOOTto aim a gun at a person or a place where people might be, in order to prevent them from moving or escaping 🔊 He stepped into the doorway and swung the gun up to cover the corridor.10 sportDS to stay close to a member of the opposing team or a part of the field in order to prevent your opponents from gaining points11 music to perform or record a song that was originally recorded by another artist 🔊 They’ve covered several hits from the 1980s.12 cover (all) the bases13 cover yourself (against something)14 cover your tracksTHESAURUScover (also cover up) to put something over, on, or around something else, to hide it, protect it, or improve its appearanceCover the dough, and leave it to rise.She wears a lot of make-up to cover her spots.put something over something to put a cloth, blanket etc loosely over the top of something in order to cover itThey gave him a blanket to put over his legs.wrap (also wrap up) to put paper, plastic, cloth etc tightly around something in order to protect, decorate, or post itI haven’t wrapped her birthday present yet.envelop literary to surround something completely so that it is difficult to see – used especially about darkness, smoke, and cloudsAt sunset, darkness enveloped the town.be shrouded in mist/darkness/smoke etc literary to be covered and hidden in mist, smoke etcThe mountains were shrouded in mist. cover for somebody cover something ↔ over cover up→ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
coverA flight from Los Angeles to New York covers 2459 miles.In one twenty-five day period, he covered 800 miles.He was about fifty, with strands of fair hair covering a receding hair line.Most health insurers don't cover any surgery that is done for cosmetic reasons.Kennedy is one of the combatants in the Congressional struggle to reform federal law covering both illegal and legal immigrants.The legislation was felt to be a success, for in 1898 the types of crimes covered by it were expanded.A 32-page supplement covers European culture and lifestyle.The Ideal Home Decorating School gives you details of exclusive readers' courses that cover everything from paint effects to dried flowers.Michael Putzel now covers foreign affairs from Washington.Embarrassed, she reached for a towel to cover her body.Mrs. Moss said the robber covered her with the machine gun and told her to open her door.Perseus covered his eyes with his free hand.The book covers more than 70 local small breweries and gives all the pertinent data for each.The sections cover news writing, feature writing, interviewing, editing and newsletter production.Posters of Elvis covered practically the whole wall.Porter, who was covering Rice, was called for a foul.$29.90 a month covers the cost of all your insurance.He pulled back a corner of the blanket that covered the dead body.It took him three days to cover the distance from Laingsbury to Albertsville.Plaster can be used to cover the holes.Add salt and pepper, cover the pan, and let cook for 10-15 minutes.He was sent to Northern Ireland to cover the peace talks.His book on European history covers the period from 1914 to 2001.As you can see from the weather map, huge rain clouds are completely covering the South East.Not overstretching by trying to cover too wide a range of applications simultaneously is also important.a magazine covering women's issuesDon't worry, I've got enough to cover your ticket.cover something with somethingWe covered the sofa with a large blanket.cover ... groundHe is also an artist who covered enormous ground.In emphasising the place which the child played in his own learning process, Plowden was not covering new ground.It had been going on since 1963 and was continued despite the fact that dead trees proved to be very effective cover.It covers such ground as Education, Sexuality, Population and Possessions, using various statistics and polls.Of course it requires skill in curriculum organization to cover the necessary ground, for example by use of modular schemes and carousels.It covers much more ground than mooching.She is then able to cover the same ground, using the objectives set by the ward.He said he can cover more ground with his drive-by campaign than he could on foot.cover ... groundHe is also an artist who covered enormous ground.In emphasising the place which the child played in his own learning process, Plowden was not covering new ground.It had been going on since 1963 and was continued despite the fact that dead trees proved to be very effective cover.It covers such ground as Education, Sexuality, Population and Possessions, using various statistics and polls.Of course it requires skill in curriculum organization to cover the necessary ground, for example by use of modular schemes and carousels.It covers much more ground than mooching.She is then able to cover the same ground, using the objectives set by the ward.He said he can cover more ground with his drive-by campaign than he could on foot.cover ... costsThe oil company declined to say how much more it might bump up prices to cover its costs.Therefore, a higher product price is necessary to cover these rising costs.On the other hand, if the firm falls short of covering its fixed costs, a loss will be incurred.Some, although few, home contents policies have a reverse indemnity clause which may cover costs and damages in some cases.If the three-day time limit is not complied with the certificate will only cover costs incurred after the date of issue.The fee covers the costs of processing requests and maintaining the database.In addition there is a £20m exceptional charge to cover the costs of recent flooding.The departments would only have to cover the costs of training and equipping them.