Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Topic: LAW

Date: 1300-1400
Language: French
Origin: examiner, from Latin examinare, from examen 'weighing out'

examine

verb
     
ex‧am‧ine S3 W2 [transitive]
1 to look at something carefully and thoroughly because you want to find out more about it:
A team of divers was sent down to examine the wreck.
Hegel's philosophy will be examined in detail in Chapter 4.
examine how/whether/what etc
In the course, we will examine how and why Spain became a democracy in 1931.
examine something for something
The police will have to examine the weapon for fingerprints.
see usage note control2
examine
2MH if a doctor examines you, they look at your body to check that you are healthy
3 formalSE to ask someone questions to test their knowledge of a subject [= test]
examine somebody in/on something
You will be examined on American history.
4 lawSCL to officially ask someone questions in a court of law cross-examine
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