Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Topic: LITERATURE

Date: 1500-1600
Language: French
Origin: réviser, from Latin revisere 'to look at again'

revise

verb
     
re‧vise
1 [transitive] to change something because of new information or ideas:
The college has revised its plans because of local objections.
We have revised our estimates of population growth.
revise something upwards/downwards
Forecasts of economic growth are being revised downwards.
2 [intransitive and transitive] British EnglishSE to study facts again, in order to learn them before an examination [= review, study American English]
I've got to revise my geography.
revise for
She's revising for her history exam.
3 [transitive]ALTCN to change a piece of writing by adding new information, making improvements, or correcting mistakes [↪ amend]:
A couple of sections of the book will need to be revised.
WORD FOCUS: change WORD FOCUS: change
to change something: alter, adapt, adjust, amend, modify, revise, vary

to change a system or organization: restructure, reorganize, reform

to change something completely: transform, revolutionize

to change facts or information, or change what someone has said: twist, distort, misrepresent

easily changed: flexible, adaptable

impossible to change: fixed, final, irrevocable


See also
change
Word of the Day
The LITERATURE
Word of the Day is:

Other related topics