Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Topic: MEASUREMENT


clock

2 verb
     
clock2 [transitive]
1 to cover a distance in a particular time, or to reach a particular speed in a race:
Karen won in the 300 metres, clocking 42.9 seconds.
the first steam engine to clock 100 miles an hour
2TM to measure or record the time or speed that someone or something is travelling at
clock somebody at/doing something
The police clocked him doing between 100 and 110 miles per hour.
3 British English informal to notice someone or something, or to look at them carefully:
Did you clock the bloke by the door?
4 British English to reduce the number of miles or kilometres shown on the instrument in a car that says how far it has gone, in order to sell the car for more money:
He knew the car had been clocked, but he couldn't prove it.

clock in/on

phrasal verb
to record on a special card the time you arrive at or begin work [= punch in American English]
I clock on at 8:30.

clock off

phrasal verb
1 informal to leave work at the end of the day:
What time do you clock off?
2 to record on a special card the time you stop or leave work:
By 6 p.m. most workers have clocked off.

clock out

phrasal verb
to record on a special card the time you stop or leave work [= punch out American English]

clock up something

phrasal verb
to reach or achieve a particular number or amount:
The Dodgers have clocked up six wins in a row.
I clocked up 90,000 miles in my Ford.
Councillor Scott has clocked up more than 25 years on the borough council.
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