Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Topic: METEOROLOGY

Language: Old English
Origin:

storm

1 noun
     
storm1 W3
1 [countable]HEM a period of very bad weather when there is a lot of rain or snow, strong winds, and often lightning:
The storm broke (=suddenly started) at five o'clock.
a night-time thunderstorm
Twenty people were killed when storms struck the Mid-West.
There's a storm brewing (=starting) in the Pacific.
a dust storm
a summer storm
2 [countable usually singular] a situation in which people suddenly express very strong feelings about something that someone has said or done:
The governor found himself at the center of a political storm.
storm of protest/abuse/criticism etc
Government plans for hospital closures provoked a storm of protest.
3

take somewhere by storm

a) to be very successful in a particular place:
The new show took London by storm.
b) to attack a place using large numbers of soldiers, and succeed in getting possession of it
4

weather the storm

to experience a difficult period and reach the end of it without being harmed or damaged too much:
I'll stay and weather the storm.
5

a storm in a teacup

British English an unnecessary expression of strong feelings about something that is very unimportant
6

dance/sing/cook etc up a storm

to do something with all your energy:
They were dancing up a storm.
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