Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Topic: MILITARY

Date: 1200-1300
Language: Old French
Origin: comander, from Vulgar Latin commandare, from Latin commendare ( COMMEND); influenced by Latin mandare 'to order'

command

2 verb
     
command2
1

order

[intransitive and transitive] to tell someone officially to do something, especially if you are a military leader, a king etc
command somebody to do something
Captain Picard commanded the crew to report to the main deck.
command that
The General commanded that the regiment attack at once.
2

lead the military

[intransitive and transitive] to be responsible for giving orders to a group of people in the army, navy etc [↪ commander]:
He commands the 4th Battalion.
3

deserve and get

[transitive] to get something such as respect or attention because you do something well or are important or popular
command respect/attention/support etc
Philip was a remarkable teacher, able to command instant respect.
command a high fee/wage/price etc
Which graduates command the highest salaries?
4

control

[transitive] to control something:
The party that commands a majority of seats in Parliament forms the government.
5

view

[transitive] if a place commands a view, you can see something clearly from it:
The Ramses Hilton commands a magnificent view of Cairo.
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