Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Topic: NATURE

Language: Old English
Origin: is

ice

1 noun
     
ice
ice1 S2 W3
1 [uncountable]DN water that has frozen into a solid state [↪ icy]:
Would you like some ice in your drink?
Her hands were as cold as ice.
Spring flowers pushed through the slowly melting ice.
The city spent $7 million to remove snow and ice from the roads.
a cup full of crushed ice
Linda's hair sparkled with tiny ice crystals.
2

keep/put something on ice

to do nothing about a plan or suggestion for a period of time:
I'm putting my plans for a new car on ice until I finish college.
3

be (skating) on thin ice

to be in a situation in which you are likely to upset someone or cause trouble:
Don't be late again, Hugo - you're skating on thin ice.
4

the ice

a specially prepared surface of ice where you can ice skate or play ice hockey:
The two teams are ready to take to the ice.
5 [countable]
a) DFF a frozen sweet food made with fruit juice [= sorbet]
b) old-fashioned especially British EnglishDFF an ice cream
6 [uncountable] American EnglishDCJ diamonds
black ice, dry ice

; ➔ break the ice

at break1 (29)

; ➔ cut no ice

at cut1 (39)
Word of the Day
The NATURE
Word of the Day is:

Other related topics