Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Topic: NATURE

Sense: 1-4, 6-8
Date: 1400-1500
Origin: PASS1
Sense: 5
Date: 1200-1300
Language: Old French
Origin: pas, from Latin passus; PASS1

pass

2 noun
     
pass2 S2 W3 [countable]
1

document

an official piece of paper which shows that you are allowed to enter a building or travel on something without paying:
The guard checked our passes.
They issued us with free passes to the theatre.
You can buy a cheap one-day bus pass.
2

exam/test

SE a successful result in an examination [≠ fail]:
You will need at least three passes to get onto the course.
pass in
Did you get a pass in English?
The pass mark (=the mark you need to be successful) is 55%.
3

sport

DS when you kick, throw, or hit a ball to another member of your team during a game:
That was a brilliant pass by Holden.
4

make a pass at somebody

informal to try to kiss or touch another person with the intention of starting a sexual relationship with them
5

road/path

DN a high road or path that goes between mountains to the other side:
a narrow, winding mountain pass
6

stage

one part of a process that involves dealing with the whole of a group or thing several times:
On the first pass we eliminated all the candidates who didn't have the right experience.
7

aircraft

a movement in which an aircraft flies once over a place which it is attacking
8

come to a pretty/sorry pass

old-fashioned informal if things have come to a pretty or sorry pass, a situation has become very bad
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