Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Topic: NEWSPAPERS, PUBLISHING

Language: Old English
Origin: bindan

bind

1 verb
     
bind1 past tense and past participle bound
1

tie/fasten

[transitive] written
a) to tie someone so that they cannot move or escape:
They bound my arms and legs with rope.
bound and gagged (=tied up, and with cloth tied around your mouth so you cannot speak)
b) also bind up to tie things firmly together with cloth or string:
The pile of newspapers was bound with string.
2

form a connection

[transitive] to form a strong emotional or economic connection between two people, countries etc [= unite]
bind somebody/something together
Their shared experiences in war helped to bind the two communities together.
3

make somebody do something

[transitive usually passive] if you are bound by an agreement, promise etc, you must do what you have agreed to do or promised to do:
The monks are bound by vows of silence.
bind somebody to do something
Employees are not bound to give their reasons for leaving.
4

stick together

[intransitive and transitive] technical to stick together in a mass, or to make small pieces of something stick together:
The flour mixture isn't wet enough to bind properly.
bind with
The hydrogen molecule binds with the oxygen molecule.
5

book

[transitive]TCN to fasten the pages of a book together and put them in a cover bound2 (9)
6

stitch

[transitive]TIMD to sew cloth over the edge of a piece of material, or stitch over it, to strengthen it:
The edges of the blanket were bound with ribbon.

bind somebody over

phrasal verb
SCL
a) British English if someone is bound over by a court of law, they are warned that if they cause more trouble, they will be legally punished:
The demonstrators were bound over to keep the peace.
b) American English if someone is bound over for trial, they are forced by law to appear in a court
Word of the Day
The NEWSPAPERS, PUBLISHING
Word of the Day is:

Other related topics