English version

starchy in Nutrition topic

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishstarchystarch‧y /ˈstɑːtʃi $ ˈstɑːr-/ adjective  1 DFNcontaining a lot of starch1(1) starchy foods2 British EnglishPOLITE very formal and correct in your behaviour – used to show disapproval She spoke in a rather starchy manner.starchily adverbstarchiness noun [uncountable]
Examples from the Corpus
starchyWhen we suffer premenstrual symptoms, such as severe mood swings, our desire for sweet and starchy carbohydrates may surge.All the frumpy people in their starchy clothes.There was a starchy department head exchanging low fives and complicated hand slaps with a kid who barely reached his knee.He has since shed 40 pounds, but is still soft from starchy food and lack of exercise.You can obtain starches from breads and crispbreads made with non-wheat flour, and other starchy foods such as millet and rice.starchy foodsFood for the heart also means an increase in the consumption of fibre-rich starchy foods.Inevitably, all these fried and starchy items leave you craving something green.Nurses are no longer expected to sublimate their feelings behind starchy officiousness as has been the case in the not so distant past.Her comments drew a starchy response from the State Department.starchy foodsFood for the heart also means an increase in the consumption of fibre-rich starchy foods.You can obtain starches from breads and crispbreads made with non-wheat flour, and other starchy foods such as millet and rice.Using a calorie counter you can then choose starchy foods to meet this extra energy need.