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Topic: OFFICIALS


post

2 verb
     
post2 S3 [transitive]
1

letter

British EnglishTCM to send a letter, package etc by post [= mail]:
She's just gone to post a letter.
post something (off) to somebody
Did you remember to post the card to my parents?
post somebody something
I posted Barry the cheque last Friday.
2

post something through somebody's door/letter box

British English to push something through someone's letterbox:
I'll post the key through your letterbox when I leave.
3

job

[usually passive]PMPGO if you are posted somewhere, your employer sends you to work there, usually for several years
post somebody to France/London etc
He joined the British Army and was posted to Germany.
4

public notice

also post up to put up a public notice about something on a wall or notice board:
The exam results were posted on the bulletin board yesterday.
5

guard

PM to make someone be in a particular place in order to guard a building, check who enters or leaves a place, watch something etc [= station]:
Guards were to be posted around nuclear power stations.
6

keep somebody posted

spoken to regularly tell someone the most recent news about something
keep somebody posted on
I'll keep you posted on his progress.
7

profit/loss etc

especially American English to officially record and announce information about a company's financial situation or a country's economic situation:
Cisco Systems posted record profits and sales for the third fiscal quarter.
8TD

internet message

to put a message or computer document on the Internet so that other people can see it:
Could you post those new flyers on David's website?
9

be posted missing

British EnglishPM if a soldier is posted missing, it is announced officially that they have disappeared
10

post bail

law especially American English to pay a specific amount of money in order to be allowed to leave prison before your trial
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