Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Topic: PHOTOGRAPHY

Date: 1300-1400
Language: Old French
Origin: poser, from Late Latin pausare 'to stop, rest', from Latin pausa; PAUSE2

pose

1 verb
     
pose1 W3
1

cause problem

[transitive] to exist in a way that may cause a problem, danger, difficulty etc
pose a threat/danger/risk
Officials claim the chemical poses no real threat.
pose something to/for somebody/something
The events pose a challenge to the church's leadership.
Rising unemployment is posing serious problems for the administration.
pose
2

picture

[intransitive]AVTCP to sit or stand in a particular position in order to be photographed or painted, or to make someone do this
pose for
We posed for photographs.
3

pose a question

to ask a question, especially one that needs to be carefully thought about:
In her book she poses the question,'How much do we need to be happy?'
4

pose as somebody

to pretend to be someone else, in order to deceive people:
Bryce was caught posing as a lawyer.
5

to impress people

[intransitive] to dress or behave like a rich and fashionable person in order to make other people notice you or admire you
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