Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Topic: PLANTS

Language: Old English
Origin: flæsc

flesh

1 noun
     
flesh1 W3 [uncountable]
1HB the soft part of the body of a person or animal that is between the skin and the bones:
a freshwater fish with firm white flesh
2 the skin of the human body:
His flesh was red and covered in sores.
flesh
3HBP the soft part of a fruit or vegetable that can be eaten:
Cut the melon in half and scoop out the flesh.
4

in the flesh

if you see someone in the flesh, you see someone who you previously had only seen in pictures, films etc:
He looked much shorter in the flesh than on television.
5

make somebody's flesh creep/crawl

to make someone feel frightened, nervous, or uncomfortable:
The way he stared at her made her flesh creep.
6

your own flesh and blood

someone who is part of your family:
How can he treat his own flesh and blood that way?
7

the flesh

literary the physical human body, as opposed to the mind or spirit
the pleasures/desires/temptations of the flesh (=things such as drinking, eating a lot, or having sex)
8

put flesh on something

British English to give more details about something to make it clear, more interesting etc [= flesh something ↔ out]:
I'll try to put some flesh on the plan Margaret has outlined.
9

go the way of all flesh

literary to die

➔ get your pound of flesh

at pound1 (5)

; ➔ press the flesh

at press2 (14)

; ➔ the spirit is willing but the flesh is weak

at spirit1 (16)
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