Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Topic: RELIGION

Date: 1100-1200
Language: Old French
Origin: Latin gratia 'pleasing quality, kindness', from gratus; GRATEFUL

grace

1 noun
     
grace1
1

way of moving

[uncountable] a smooth way of moving that looks natural, relaxed, and attractive [= gracefulness]:
Lena moved with the grace of a dancer.
2

behaviour

a) [uncountable] polite and pleasant behaviour:
The hotel maintains traditional standards of elegance, style, and grace.
have the grace to do something
He didn't even have the grace to apologize (=he was not polite enough to apologize).
b)

graces

[plural] the skills needed to behave in a way that is considered polite and socially acceptable:
Max definitely lacked social graces.
3

more time

[uncountable] also grace period American English more time that is allowed to someone to finish a piece of work, pay a debt etc
a day's/week's etc grace
I got a few days' grace to finish my essay.
4

with (a) good/bad grace

in a willing and pleasant way, or an unwilling and angry way:
Kevin smiled and accepted his defeat with good grace.
With typical bad grace, they refused to come to the party.
5

god's kindness

formal [uncountable]RR God's kindness that is shown to people:
We are saved by God's grace.
6

there but for the grace of God (go I)

used to say that you feel lucky not to be in the same bad situation as someone else
7

prayer

[uncountable]RRC a prayer thanking God, said before a meal:
My father said grace.
8

soul

[uncountable] the state of someone's soul when it is free from evil, according to Christian belief:
He died in a state of grace (=when God has forgiven you for the wrong things you have done).
9

Your/His etc Grace

used as a title when talking to or about a duke, duchess, or archbishop
10

the Graces

RM three beautiful Greek goddesses who often appear in art

➔ airs and graces

at air1 (9)

➔ fall from grace

at fall1 (17)

➔ saving grace

at save1 (14)
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